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David Beaulieu

Care for Poinsettias

By December 3, 2003

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Most people think of Christmas poinsettia plants as disposable houseplants. But frugal readers might consider growing poinsettias for next year using this year's plants. Doing so successfully, though, requires some tips on the caring for them. Fortunately, Marie Iannotti tells us all about care for poinsettias in this article.

Comments

July 31, 2007 at 4:42 am
(1) monitor says:

The link (like many Poinsettia plants) is dead.

July 31, 2007 at 1:25 pm
(2) landscaping says:

Thanks. I’ve just updated the link.

July 15, 2009 at 1:03 pm
(3) Mary Daley says:

I planted my christmas poinsettia outside and it’s thriving. However, since I live in Atlanta, I know I must bring it in before a freeze – what do I do to help it flower near next Christmas? Thanks – M. Daley

July 15, 2009 at 3:29 pm
(4) landscaping says:

Mary,

The article I link to from the post above questions whether such care for poinsettias is worth the effort. I tend to be in the camp that says it’s not, but the article contains the information you’ll need to proceed, in case you fall into the other camp.

February 14, 2011 at 1:50 pm
(5) Toni says:

I got a poinsettia plant for a gift six years ago and each year I do as your article says. My plant went from the small size sold at stores to a plant that’s a three foot ball and gives me the pale yellow bracts each winter. With a little care these plants last forever and will reward you with gorgeous color each year. I live in Ohio where it gets very cold in the winter but a friend leaves hers outside and it’s huge. TLC goes a long way :-)

December 17, 2011 at 1:19 pm
(6) jeff pecenko says:

Ok I have a year old poinsettia andf its very nice,but how do i make the leaves turn red,now its christmas time again??

December 17, 2011 at 10:59 pm
(7) landscaping says:

Jeff,

Marie explains the process in the article linked to from above. Good luck.

August 12, 2012 at 8:12 pm
(8) colleen says:

My poinsettia plants were thriving dispite the drought this summer. However just last week moles have been digging around their roots and the leaves have turn yellowish. Is the yellowish turn a watering problem or something else?

August 13, 2012 at 7:29 am
(9) landscaping says:

Colleen,

Every case is different, but yellowing leaves is often the sign of an over-watering problem.

October 20, 2012 at 2:03 pm
(10) Dana says:

I live on the central coast of Calif. and my plants do pretty well despite my not so careful care. I have 4 plants now and would really like to plant them outside. Where is the best location to grow them outside? Our night temps rarely go below the 40′s, should I just cover them at night?

October 21, 2012 at 9:05 pm
(11) landscaping says:

Dana,

To grow poinsettias outdoors, plant them in a well-draining soil in full to partial sun. And yes, cover them if the temperature drops into the 40s.

December 2, 2012 at 11:16 am
(12) Mark says:

Transplanting “starters”. . .
We have a friend that sells poinsettias, and he gave us some that were damaged. Can a plant be started from a branch, say, by sticking it in the dirt like one can do with many other plants? My friend even stated that someone had told him to burn the naked tip where it broke away from the main plant prior to sticking in soil. Any information on any of this?

December 3, 2012 at 8:42 am
(13) landscaping says:

Mark,

It’s possible to propagate poinsettias by rooting cuttings, but it is difficult. You have to get many factors right: sunlight, moisture, sterility of growing medium. If you wish to take a crack at it, I suggest going to a good garden supply store and asking for a rooting hormone.

December 20, 2013 at 8:02 pm
(14) Marcie says:

I have two poinsettias I put in the cellar last year last year after christmas and for got they are there are their, I pulled tthe dead off off but it looks dead is it, there is no green

December 21, 2013 at 10:30 am
(15) landscaping says:

If there’s no green at all, Marcie, they are indeed, unfortunately, dead.

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